Japan Red Cross
Medals & Badges
日本赤十字社
紀章・徽章
Regular membership medal. Medals made before 1941 are usually made of sterling silver.
Aluminum is used for later medals.
Dated Meiji 21 [1888]. Note that this date is used for all Red Cross medals regardless of date of issue.
From Wikipedia:

Count Sano Tsunetami founded the Philanthropic Society (博愛社
Hakuaisha), a relief organization for the injured of the
Satsuma Rebellion of 1877; a modified version of the Japanese flag was used by the organization until 1887. Its name was
changed to the Japanese Red Cross on 2 September 1887 following Japan's admission to the International Committee of the
Red Cross. Later that year, the Society engaged in its first disaster relief after the eruption of Mount Bandai.

From the beginning, the Japanese Imperial family, especially Empress Shōken, provided active support for Red Cross
activities. The attendance of the imperial family made membership in the Society socially attractive to members of the
kazoku
aristocracy and leading members of society. By the start of the Russo-Japanese War (1904–1905), the Japanese Red Cross
was the largest in the world, with over a million members.

The Society played an outstanding role with regards to the many Russian prisoners of war, gaining Japan a considerable
amount of good public relations in the western press. This image was cultivated by the hosting of volunteer nurses and medical
staff from the United States, France, Germany and Great Britain. A report from Anita Newcomb McGee on conditions in Japan
was instrumental in obtaining government assistance in the revitalization of the American Red Cross.

After the 1906 San Francisco earthquake, the Japanese Red Cross collected $146,000 for the American relief effort, marking
American relief effort, marking the first overseas operation by the Society.

During World War I, German prisoners of war, captured by the Imperial Japanese Army at Tsingtao, were treated fairly well with
the help of the Red Cross. In 1934, the Japanese Red Cross society hosted the 15th International Conference of the Red Cross
at Tokyo.

During the Second Sino-Japanese War (1937–1945), the Japanese Red Cross played a vital role in assisting Japanese
civilians and wounded soldiers. However, as the Imperial Japanese Army tended to ignore the Geneva Convention, government
and military restrictions hampered the ability of the Japanese Red Cross to assist the hundreds of thousands of European
military and civilians interned in prison camps in the Japanese-occupied areas of Southeast Asia.

After World War II, the Japanese Red Cross was reformed under American advisers. On 14 August 1952, it was given legal
status as a special non-profit corporation.
Bow lapel pins
Ribbon bar
Red Cross 1904-5 Russia War commemorative medal with suspension bar.
Red Cross 1904-5 Russia War commemorative
medal with suspension bar and enamel Red Cross.
The attached blue rosette indicates a Life Member.
The large attached rosette indicates a Special Member.
Red cardboard box. Also comes in a lacquered wood case (see below).
Red Cross Special Member badge for women.
Women's version with bow ribbon and large affixed rosette.
The box reads 'Women's Badge, Silver Special Member's Badge.'
Women's Red Cross Life Member medal with
rosette and cardboard case. The case is
labeled 'Women's Life Member Medal.'
Post-war Special Member medal with gold
highlights.
Courtesy of the Brenton W. collection.
Courtesy of the Brenton W. collection.
A rare miniature medal is to the left.
Courtesy of the Brenton W. collection.
Various cases. Many of them came unmarked. The colors vary greatly, too.
Women's Regular Member
3rd Class Philanthropy badge from the Japan Red Cross. Bamboo
leaves on the top, both sides, and at the bottom. The ring itself is in
the shape of bamboo stalks.

'
Tokushi [篤志]' means volunteer but can also translated as charity
or benevolence.

According to an undated pamphlet I have (probably late Meiji era),
the 3rd Class badge was awarded to Special or Life Members who
made a one-time donation of 25 yen. OR to Special or Life Members
who donated an additional 30 yen over three payments.
2nd Class Philanthropy badge from the Japan Red Cross. Imperial crest at the
top. Bamboo leaves on both sides and at the bottom. The ring itself is in the
shape of bamboo stalks.

'
Tokushi [篤志]' means volunteer but can also translated as charity or
benevolence.

According to an undated pamphlet I have (probably late Meiji era), the 2nd Class
badge was awarded to Special or Life Members who made a one-time donation
of 50 yen. OR to a holder of the 3rd Class Philanthropy Badge who made a one-
time donation of 25 yen. OR to a holder of the 3rd Class Philanthropy Badge who
donated an additional 30 yen over three payments.
1st Class Philanthropy Badge from the Japan Red Cross. Imperial Phoenix at
the top, imperial crests on both sides, and bamboo leaves at the bottom. The
ring itself is in the shape of bamboo stalks.

'
Tokushi [篤志]' means volunteer but can also translated as charity or
benevolence.

According to an undated pamphlet I have (probably late Meiji era), the 1st Class
badge was awarded to Special or Life Members who made a one-time donation
of 75 yen. OR to a holder of the 3rd Class Philanthropy Badge who made a one-
time donation of 50 yen. OR to a holder of the 2nd Class Philanthropy Badge
who made a one-time donation of 25 yen. OR to a holder of the 2nd Class
Philanthropy Badge who donated an additional 30 yen over the course of a
calendar year.
Labeled 'Worker's badge'
Very rare silver Japan Red Cross badge commemorating the 1904-5 Russia War.

The bronze badges are common, but this is the first silver badge I have seen. That being
said, I don't think this is a pure silver badge--just silver colored.
A pair of 1942 Red Cross documents awarded to the same person as
well as the original mailing tube.

The documents are for the Merit Medal and Special Member Medal.
Both are dated April 15, 1942.

The man's name was Nakata Enzo, and he lived in North Saitama
District, Kaga Town. The Red Cross branch that mailed him these was
located in
Urawa City.
Heavy and beautiful Japanese Red Cross Silver Medal of Merit wood plaque.
The inscription and border design are engraved on a metal plate. The medal
piece is attached. 

This example also has the outer cardboard box with the recipient's name
as well as a booklet listing the award winners at that ceremony.

Both the award and booklet are dated Heisei 19 [2007] November 15.

Weighs about 1600 grams! Total size (with box) is 34 cm by 29 cm.
100th Anniversary of the Japan Red Cross.
Shizuoka Prefecture Branch.
Small sterling silver Japanese Red Cross badge. Unmarked case.
'Emperor Enthronement Commemorative.' Probably the 1928 event.

Measures about 1.5 cm diameter.