Yasukuni Shrine
Soldier Enshrinement Badges
靖国神社臨時大祭徽章
Yasukuni Shrine KIA Soldier Enshrinement Ceremony Badge with original envelope. There are some
unmarked, colored ribbons of unknown meaning inside.
Made of aluminum; dated Showa 17 [1942] April 24.
When a Japanese soldier or sailor died, he was enshrined at Yasukuni Shrine and regarded as a god. The ceremonies
were considered to be of the highest importance, and military men would often use the phrase 'Meet you at Yasukuni!'
before going on a mission.

The Yasukuni badge was not given as an award. It was given to the bereaved family members at the enshrinement
ceremonies and served as an ID just for the events. These ceremonies were held twice a year (spring and autumn). The
earliest badge  have found so far dates to spring 1936. To be enshrined, a soldier's name, rank, and the date and
circumstances about his death were required.

Although the records are not public now, during the war Yasukuni record books were published twice a year. I think the
numbers on the ribbon probably correspond to a seating area and a seat number.

The badges are the central item, but as you can see below, there is a variety of ancillary items that came with the badges.
Envelopes, train tickets, donation envelopes, invitations, etc. These paper items rarely survived. They were obviously
disposable.

The badges were cheaply made of aluminum. On the reverse the date of the ceremony was inscribed, and this should
always match the date at the top of the ribbon.
Yasukuni KIA enshrinement badge, matched pair. Note the different color ribbon,
the rising sun emblem in the center, and the lack of a date. These may be an
earlier version or perhaps very late war.
Yasukuni KIA enshrinement badge with
extremely rare paper bag. Note that the
numbers on the bag and badge match.
Dated Showa 18 [1942] Autumn.
Three different dates. From the left: 1935 (?), 1940, and 1943.
Also dated on the reverse. Clockwise, from
the lower left: 1944, 1944, 1940, 1939.
KIA set, 4 pieces. Included are the following:

1. Hard cardboard invitation card for the enshrinement ceremony
held at Yasukuni Shrine. This is dated Showa 15 [1940] April. The
deceased soldier is Army Superior Private Kawamura [??].

2. Envelope for the above invitation. Marked with the number
11526.

3. Envelope for the small cherry blossom family ID badge worn at
the ceremonies. Sorry to say, the badge is gone. Marked with the
number 11526. Dated Showa 15 [1940] spring.

4. Envelope asking for a donation of 15 yen. Marked with the
number 11526. (Unused so I suppose no donation was given.)
A KIA Yasukuni Shrine 'enshrinement of the dead' set from
Japan. Rare! Included are

1. Blossom badge dated Spring 1943

2. Envelope. It reads: ‘1 pair of passes for the Tokyo train system.
1 pair of passes for the subway train. Yasukuni Shrine Special
Festival Committee.’

3. Train pass. This reads, in part, ‘Showa 18 [1943] spring,
Yasukuni Shrine Festival, Special Car for the Bereaved. Good
from April 14 to May 6, 1943.’

4. Train pass. This reads, in part, ‘Yasukuni Shrine, Special Train
Pass. Good from April 19 to May 1, 1943.’

5. Bus pass. This reads, in part, ‘Yasukuni Shrine Special
Festival for the Bereaved, Special Bus Pass. Good from April 19
to May 2, 1943.’

6. Business card. This reads, in part, ‘Soldier Relief Association
Aichi Prefecture Branch, Director Ozeki [??].’

7. A hotel receipt that shows the family name was Yamamoto
and 2 people stayed in the Sunagawa Hotel. The total they paid
was 46 yen and 20 sen.

8. Unknown ribbon pin.
Yasukuni Shrine KIA Soldier Enshrinement
Ceremony Badge.
Made of aluminum; dated Showa 18 [1943] April.
Yasukuni Shrine KIA Soldier Enshrinement
Ceremony Badge.
Made of aluminum; dated Showa 14 [1939] April.
A pair of Yasukuni Shrine KIA Soldier Enshrinement Ceremony badges with the original envelope. The
numbers all match. Rare to find these together.

Made of aluminum; dated Showa 14 [1939] Autumn.
Iwamoto Kumasaku. Measures about 18.5 cm by 13 cm.
April 1943
Yasukuni KIA enshrinement badge, dated
1938. Note the gold gilt blossom and
rising sun emblem in the center.
Versions dated 1940 and later do not
have these.
October 1943
Yasukuni Shrine Soldier Enshrinement Ceremony gift photo frame. Nice
way to honor a fallen soldier or sailor. Measures about 14 cm by 20 cm.
The photo area is about 5 cm by 6.5 cm.

Inscribed 'Gift. Showa 14 [1939] Yasukuni Shrine Enshrinement
Ceremonies. Army Ministry. Navy Ministry.'

This appears to have been an official gift from the Army and Navy
Ministries, but I am not sure. The embossed design shows the Yasukuni
Shrine gate and grounds.
Scarce Killed in Action soldier set. Very hard to find this kind of
documentation for a single soldier.

Included in this stunning set are the following:

1. KIA Cherry Blossom Badge for bereaved families. Cased.

2. KIA Cherry Blossom Badge award document. Dated August 28, 1940.
'Awarded to Nagai Yoshihiko, father of Deceased Imperial Army Logistics
Officer Superior Private Nagai Katsuyoshi. Army Ministry.'

3. Soldier passbook for Nagai. Last entry states his death.
This shows that Nagai is from Nagasaki.

4. Imperial Military Reservist Association passbook for Nagai.
No personal entries found.

5.
Yasukuni Shrine Soldier Enshrinement Ceremony badges with original,
matched envelope. The ceremony was held in spring 1941.

6. 2 train passes from Nagasaki to Tokyo, given by Yasukuni Shrine so
the family could attend the ceremony. They show that Nagai's father and
mother used the passes. The father was 53 years old at that time; the
mother 52.

7. Un-inscribed discount coupons for bereaved families: train passes,
museum and zoo discounts.

8. Round-trip train passes (unused) from Asahara to Shibuya.

9. Four 10-sen bank notes.

10. A few documents hinting at the military service of the father.

11. A document dated March 31, 1939 stating that Army Logistics Officer
Superior Private Nagai Katsuyoshi should report to the Kokura-Inoue
Platoon.
April 1936